Financial Times: Huawei under fire as politicians fret over 5G security

For now, officials said the worry is guaranteeing the kit cannot be attacked by hostile cyber hackers — who may come from any country and not necessarily China. The evaluation centre which tests all Huawei kit before clearing it for use by telecoms operators has not found a smoking gun which points to direct Chinese espionage or malicious activity.

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The Hill: Groups push House Dems to spotlight T-Mobile-Sprint merger

Concerned about the lack of attention the merger has gotten from Republican leadership, a coalition of consumer and labor groups sent a letter to top Democrats on Wednesday asking them to hold hearings on the deal early next year.

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Associated Press: New Zealand halts Huawei from 5G upgrade over security fears

New Zealand’s previous conservative government had a close relationship with China. But over the past year under liberal Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern, New Zealand has pulled back somewhat, embracing a warmer relationship with Japan and putting resources into the Pacific, in part to counter China’s growing influence there.

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SDX Central: U.S. Government Pressures Allies to Shun Huawei in 5G Contracts, Report Says

The government’s decision to get involved in the equipment purchases made by telecom companies in other countries comes at a time when many network operators are preparing to upgrade their networks to 5G. This transformation will include purchasing new hardware and software from companies like Huawei, Ericsson, Nokia, and Samsung.

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Proposed T-Mobile Sprint Merger Highlight National Security Implications as Saudi Arabia Dominates the Headlines

As the FCC consideration of the proposed T-Mobile-Sprint Merger continues, and as Senators prepare to be briefed on the murder of Jamal Khashoggi, threats to our national security become increasingly dangerous as news breaks of Saudi Arabia’s use of new technology that allowed Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman to use spyware to track Khashoggi’s whereabouts.

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Politico Morning Tech: Get out of Huawei?

U.S. authorities are pressing allies to drop Chinese telecom giant Huawei amid concerns over meddling in 5G networks, according to The Wall Street Journal. “The U.S. government has initiated an extraordinary outreach campaign to foreign allies, trying to persuade wireless and internet providers in these countries to avoid telecommunications equipment from China’s Huawei Technologies Co.”

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T-MOBILE TWEAKS SPRINT DEAL RATIONALE AS OPPONENTS SEE PROBLEMS

Bloomberg: T-Mobile US Inc. is offering a revised rationale for buying Sprint Corp., a turn that critics say is a sign the carrier’s earlier arguments weren’t winning over U.S. officials who can bless or kill the deal.

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As National Security Concerns Soar, Sprint Execs Should Put Down the Bubble Wrap and Provide Answers

Even as criticism of the proposed T-Mobile/Sprint merger grows, Sprint executives have placed their Kansas City homes on the market in anticipation of moving to a new corporate home. Sprint’s executives are ignoring the growing national security concerns and continue to move forward without any regard for potential harm the proposed merger will cause.

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MSNBC: Trita Parsi: Trump administration has essentially turned into Saudi Crown Prince's lawyer

The White House has reportedly considered extraditing a Turkish cleric who is a foe of Turkish president Tayyip Erdogan in the wake of the murder of Turkish journalist Jamal Khashoggi, allegedly by agents of the Saudi Arabian government.

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T-Mobile/Sprint Merger: Bad for American Consumers and Bad for Competition

The proposed T-Mobile/Sprint merger will result in fewer choices and higher prices of pre-paid and post-paid customers.

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FierceWireless: Mike Rogers’ Outlines Threats Posed By Huawei & ZTE in U.S. Telecom Networks

FierceWireless reports on former U.S. Representative and Chair of the House Intelligence Committee, Mike Rogers’, detailed explanation of the national security threats posed by the use of Huawei and ZTE equipment in telecommunication networks. He explains the extremely close ties both companies have to the Chinese government, who are under suspicion of using Huawei tools for spying on foreign networks. Rogers points out that Canada, Great Britain, and Australia have all banned or warned against use of Huawei and ZTE equipment in 5G build outs and calls it “absolutely naive” to not pay close attention to these issues.

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Fierce Wireless: Huawei’s greatest critic lays out his case against the company

Actions and statements against Huawei and ZTE have come from almost all levels of the U.S. government. In its lengthy filing on the threat posed by foreign telecom equipment suppliers, the FCC laid out a document trail that stretched from Congress’ 2018 National Defense Authorization Act (that in part banned the Department of Defense from using equipment from Huawei and ZTE) to a White House executive order from on the topic from 2017, a Presidential policy directive from 2013 and a report from the U.S. Government Accountability Office from 2013.

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Sprint Promised an Open and Transparent Conversation About Merger Issues, But Has Since Gone Silent While Experts Continue to Raise Alarm

Sprint Spokesperson David Tovar has proven that Sprint and T-Mobile are all talk when it comes to reassuring the American people that the Sprint/T-Mobile merger won't harm American national security. After initiating a Twitter exchange with Protect America’s Wireless (PAW), Tovar went silent when questions got tough.

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American Conservative: Hit Saudi Arabia With Your Pocketbook

The Trump administration appears to have surrendered much of the leverage it has over Riyadh, even pointing to continued arms sales—which help the Saudis engineer the starvation of up to 14 million Yemenis—as necessary because of jobs here in this country. But shouldn’t the U.S. be using those same arms sales as leverage to try and stop the Saudi’s bad behavior? Since when did the roles flip?

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PROTECTING AMERICAN NATIONAL SECURITY - FACTS ABOUT THE SPRINT/T-MOBILE MERGER

American national security is inextricably linked to our digital future. As we see nearly every day, foreign entities, competitors, and adversaries are targeting American networks to gain access to government secrets, economic information, and personal data – and we can only expect it to increase.

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Guardian: Scott Morrison to reveal $3bn in Pacific funding to counter Chinese influence

Morrison will use a speech delivered at the Lavarack Barracks at Townsville on Thursday to flag the new program of loans and grants for infrastructure development in Pacific countries and Timor Leste, and the prime minister is also expected to commit an extra $1bn for Efic, Australia’s export financing agency.

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Bloomberg: SoftBank Is Planning a $1.2 Billion Solar Plant in Saudi Arabia

The plant, to the north of Riyadh, would generate 1.8 gigawatts of power, the people said, asking not to be identified because the plans are private. SoftBank has started preliminary talks with banks and developers to gauge interest in the facility, they said.

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Imagine what the Chinese will be able to do if they dominate the backbone of 5G networks around the world

National security must be a top consideration as we move towards a 5G network. But the proposed T-Mobile/Sprint merger could put development of 5G into the hands of Chinese companies through their equipment suppliers, Huawai and ZTE. At the Hudson Institute’s Promoting American Leadership in 5G Technology event, Karl Rove explained the dangers of putting 5G development into the hands of the “New T-Mobile” with significant ties to Huawei despite mounting evidence of cyber espionage.

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CNBC: China's Huawei reportedly used for espionage

John Rutledge, Safanad, weighs in on a report from Australia that telecom company Huawei was used by Chinese spies to infiltrate a foreign network, and what this means for its partnership with Softbank.

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Protect America’s Wireless Blasts Sprint for Blasting “Merger Opposition Group”

Sprint is on the defensive after foreign policy experts raised national security concerns on Protect America’s Wireless’ press call yesterday. In Politico’s Morning Tech, Senior Vice President of Corporate Communications at Sprint David Tovar claimed the merger will “enhance security”. He went on to call the concerns, “completely misleading and inaccurate,” but failed to provide any evidence supporting his claims.

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New York Times: DealBook Briefing: SoftBank’s Chief Stands by the Saudis

Masayoshi Son, SoftBank’s C.E.O., finally spoke out today against the killing of the Saudi dissident Jamal Khashoggi. But he added that his company wouldn’t distance itself from Saudi Arabia — the biggest investor in its nearly $100 billion Vision Fund.

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Axios: Login 5. Opposition to merger of T-Mobile and Sprint

Outside lobbying groups and competitors are ramping up their attacks on T-Mobile's proposed acquisition of Sprint, Axios' David McCabe reports.

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Globe and Mail: China Telecom diverted internet traffic in U.S. and Canada, report finds

Although the Chinese government has signed no-hacking agreements with numerous Western countries...to prohibit direct attacks on computer networks, the accords did nothing to prevent the diverting of online traffic on key Western internet infrastructure...

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Forbes: America's 5G Rendezvous With Destiny

Is there any way to stop the China 5G juggernaut? ... It will require quick and forthright action by our Department of Defense; forceful leadership from this president and White House; and a U.S. willing to go ... with high-tech guns blazing, to upset China’s planned victory party.

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Business Insider: The very purpose of the Chinese tech company ZTE is to spy on other countries, a competitor alleges in new court documents

ZTE was created for intelligence-gathering reasons and has been engaged in extensive bribery, according to new documents filed in a Dallas County, Texas, district court.

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NYT: When Trump Phones Friends, the Chinese and the Russians Listen and Learn

American spy agencies, the officials said, had learned that China and Russia were eavesdropping on the president’s cellphone calls from human sources inside foreign governments and intercepting communications between foreign officials.

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Observer: Is Journalist-Murdering Saudi Arabia Your Next Cell Phone Provider? Why You Should Worry

The national security implications of a 5G network go beyond those involved in simply owning a port, including issues like surveillance of personal phone calls and the mining of private metadata.

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T-Mobile/Sprint Merger National Security Issues

The Sprint/T-Mobile merger raises a number of serious national security concerns which should be thoroughly vetted by Congress. Sprint and T-Mobile have predicated their merger as the pathway to 5G. If that is the public interest benefit of this transaction, it must be weighed against the public interest harms. Chief among those is the serious national security implications of relying on 5G telecommunications equipment manufactured by companies with close ties to the Chinese Government.

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CNBC: China reportedly used chips to spy on US tech companies

CNBC's Brian Sullivan reports on a Bloomberg story saying that Chinese spy chips have been found in hardware used by Apple and Amazon.

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Bloomberg: The Big Hack: How China Used a Tiny Chip to Infiltrate U.S. Companies

"The attack by Chinese spies reached almost 30 U.S. companies, including Amazon and Apple, by compromising America’s technology supply chain, according to extensive interviews with government and corporate sources."

Read more at Bloomberg.

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SPRINT/T-MOBILE DEAL MUST NOT ALLOW CHINA TO THREATEN US SECURITY

The Hill: The proposed merger between Sprint and T-Mobile poses serious national security risks that President Trump, his national security team, and Republicans in Congress should take very seriously.

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